sidewalkable

a tumblelog about sidewalk explorations proposed by an urban scout

January 7, 2010 at 3:40pm
Paris, May 2009.
Encounter with a vehicle to the Information Superhighway sprayed on the sidewalk in the French capital: a visual marker that can lead the phone user to a website. The addition of the Unified Resource Locator below the tag may help less tech-savvy people to get the point of this new form of advertisement.
The sidewalk used as an indirect communication board.

Paris, May 2009.

Encounter with a vehicle to the Information Superhighway sprayed on the sidewalk in the French capital: a visual marker that can lead the phone user to a website. The addition of the Unified Resource Locator below the tag may help less tech-savvy people to get the point of this new form of advertisement.

The sidewalk used as an indirect communication board.

January 5, 2010 at 3:59pm
Geneva, July 2007.
Near a squat that vanished recently, chalk drawings here and there depicting tic-tac-toe grids (completed or not). The sidewalk as a game platform to some extent. Playful activities must have been intense around here and these are just explicit traces of the games… that stays here while their authors have certainly moved to other tasks.

Geneva, July 2007.

Near a squat that vanished recently, chalk drawings here and there depicting tic-tac-toe grids (completed or not). The sidewalk as a game platform to some extent. Playful activities must have been intense around here and these are just explicit traces of the games… that stays here while their authors have certainly moved to other tasks.

January 4, 2010 at 11:54am
Geneva, March 2008
Chalk outlines (although here it’s duct-tape instead of chalk) is one of the mysterious element you can find stuck on pavement. In people’s imagination, they often refer to an outline of a murder or accident’s victim’s body, supposedly drawn by the investigators. I don’t really know whether it’s really done but I find it original to run across such device. In the case above, given the shape of the outline, it was surely part of something else.

Geneva, March 2008

Chalk outlines (although here it’s duct-tape instead of chalk) is one of the mysterious element you can find stuck on pavement. In people’s imagination, they often refer to an outline of a murder or accident’s victim’s body, supposedly drawn by the investigators. I don’t really know whether it’s really done but I find it original to run across such device. In the case above, given the shape of the outline, it was surely part of something else.

January 3, 2010 at 5:14am
Amsterdam, May 2007.
This picture shows two interesting characteristics:
The sidewalk structure in the Netherlands, and Amsterdam in particular: a quite large edge (with a dark color where each paving stone penetrates its neighbor) and a large number of paving stone made of bricks).
The presence of duct-tape, which looks as if the sidewalk needed a band-aid to cover minor wounds.

Amsterdam, May 2007.

This picture shows two interesting characteristics:

  • The sidewalk structure in the Netherlands, and Amsterdam in particular: a quite large edge (with a dark color where each paving stone penetrates its neighbor) and a large number of paving stone made of bricks).
  • The presence of duct-tape, which looks as if the sidewalk needed a band-aid to cover minor wounds.

January 2, 2010 at 3:00am
Geneva, September 2005.
When exploring urban environments, the diversity of elements scattered on sidewalks is an easy starting point.
Whatever this comes from, it’s a curious encounter that I instantaneously decided to document. The curious clump of hair, that looks like navel fluff, looks as if a city inhabitant (human or non-human) left some weird traces. The equivalent of a snake which molted its own skin after a while. Although it surely comes from an living creature, one can see this trace as a natural production that fall out to make way for new growth. Besides, the contrast between this clump and the industrial quality of the sidewalk surface is stunning; it simply reveals that there is room for biological components in this flat and grey surface.
Let’s take this picture as a metaphor of how sidewalks are lively places.

Geneva, September 2005.

When exploring urban environments, the diversity of elements scattered on sidewalks is an easy starting point.

Whatever this comes from, it’s a curious encounter that I instantaneously decided to document. The curious clump of hair, that looks like navel fluff, looks as if a city inhabitant (human or non-human) left some weird traces. The equivalent of a snake which molted its own skin after a while. Although it surely comes from an living creature, one can see this trace as a natural production that fall out to make way for new growth. Besides, the contrast between this clump and the industrial quality of the sidewalk surface is stunning; it simply reveals that there is room for biological components in this flat and grey surface.

Let’s take this picture as a metaphor of how sidewalks are lively places.

January 1, 2010 at 11:50am
Geneva, January 1st, 2010.
New year’s party is over. As attested by the broken bottle of Champagne, the last traces of the festive event can be encountered on the streets close to where people enjoyed the fireworks few hours before.
Shards of glass are highly common on sidewalks and given that this project starts off on January 1, it’s a good way to illustrate it.

Geneva, January 1st, 2010.

New year’s party is over. As attested by the broken bottle of Champagne, the last traces of the festive event can be encountered on the streets close to where people enjoyed the fireworks few hours before.

Shards of glass are highly common on sidewalks and given that this project starts off on January 1, it’s a good way to illustrate it.